Paleo and Kids

I have kids and they are not strict Paleo, as I like to goal towards for myself. There are 2 reasons for this: 1, because their father doesn’t follow Paleo and 2, because we allow them to indulge in snacks at school or friends’ houses without restriction. This is not ideal in my mind and I struggle tremendously with the idea that I am not providing them the best in health. However, I am confident in the fact that I do what I can. I set them up for success by creating meals and snacks in a paleo fashion, I am honest with them about nutrition and I continue to talk with my husband about options.

For example I had a recent small victory; my little one is a huge fan of tuna fish. She’ll eat it right out of the bowl I used to prepare it if I give her a spoon. I serve her tuna without bread all the time but my husband serves her a tuna fish sandwich. Finally I asked my husband to no longer make her a sandwich and just give her a lump on her plate or in a bowl. The very next day, she had tuna fish for lunch and my heart was happy and light when I looked at her plate to see there was no bread included in her meal. SUCCESS! …And our journey continues.

My girls, newly 4 and 5 years old.
Photo courtesy of Renee Campbell

If you’re like me, you don’t have a lot of free time so I’ll keep it short and provide a few ideas when transitioning your family to a clean eating lifestyle:

1. Drinks… invest in filtered water bottles. My girls love them! They fill them independently and grab them from the fridge whenever they desire. Giving kids a sense of control and teaching them independence is always a plus. Filtered water bottles are also easy to travel with and don’t cost any money after the initial $10 investment, at least until you replace the filter. I believe it is recommended 600 refills. If you keep an eye out, sometimes you’ll find them on sale! We own the Bobble brand, found at Target in the workout aisle. These also make an excellent present. We gifted 6 last Christmas.

2. Breakfast & Snacks… Change your mindset on what a breakfast meal or snack option can be. Healthy meals should be full of protein and fat for yourself AND your kids which includes breakfast. Starting the day with a bowl or plate full of grain and sugar is not the right foot to send your child off on, to be met with behavior and mood fluctuations when their blood sugar crashes. You will feel satiated, strong and clear-headed throughout the day when you start the morning with a nice serving of protein. Eat real food when you are hungry and in turn, feed real food to a hungry child, not nutrient empty and sugar heavy crackers, pretzels and cookies. Snacks can be leftovers, eggs, nuts, whole fruits, cut veggies. Breakfast essentials will also include leftovers from dinner, eggs, meat, plants. It’s as easy as handing them a banana.

3. Stock… YOU control the items brought into your house. Stock it with healthy, natural foods: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables and fruit. Easy, right? Not so fast; In my household, we are divided on our preferred stock and my husband enjoys having a stock of snacks, sweets and soda. These are kept in a specific spot/cupboard and when the girls ask to have something from that cupboard, I simply remind them “let’s pick a healthy option right now, we can save the sweets for another time” and we move on. It’s not always easy, but it’s certainly not out of my control. Children thrive with boundaries and information and they look to their parents for these things. Every interaction has the opportunity to be a learning experience.

4. Be prepared… Invest in a thermal bag, if you don’t already have one. Real food needs to be kept fresh, after all. Confession: I have 4 thermal/insulated bags of various shapes and sizes. Throw an ice pack in and then fill with staples like cut veggies or whole fruits, yogurt, hardboiled eggs, or leftover scrambled eggs from breakfast, rolled up (nitrate free) lunch meats, nuts, berries and water.

5. Cook Day… Now that I have the hang of things, I do this once a week. It was twice a week while I was still getting used to this lifestyle. Cook Day ends up being a day when there is little scheduled outside the home so I can spend time preparing meals, sides and options for the coming days. Whether it’s because I won’t be home to cook or because I’d like to have a few items on hand for breakfast and lunches for the girls, it’s fun to cook and stash. Cooking with simple foods, herbs and spices is easy and pleasurable. This is of course an extension of #4 “Be prepared”.

6. Keep It Simple…When looking for a preferred option in the grocery, check the ingredients list. If there are more than 5 ingredients, hesitate to buy it at all. If the ingredients are easily pronounced, GREAT! If there is soy or wheat, corn or sugar, especially in the first 3 listed, move onto the next option.

GREAT! You’re family is set and ready to go, what next? School. 

1. Communication… Talk to your teachers, principal, director, other parents, volunteers, whomever you come in contact with. These are all people you should be talking to regularly anyway as they are a big part of your child’s future. Don’t second guess yourself either, your kid is not the only one with an allergy, disease, disorder or preference when it comes to food (that’s the whole point). The more you talk about your preferences and dislikes, the more people will listen and respond. This is the future, friends. Share your healthy lifestyle through example, others will follow in their own way, each making steps towards wellness. What better legacy?

2. Control… When approached with bringing an item for a class party, go for the gold, choose “Cookies” or “Cake” or “Candy”, seriously. You can make near anything in a much friendlier fashion. Plus, kids don’t care! It’s a cookie! And if they don’t eat it? Good. Instead of juice, provide mini water bottles. Kids appreciate their small stature and grown up affiliation. Best part: the store brand is $3 or less for 24. Done.

3. Pick Your Battles… Stay calm and focused. Remember, you are a parent, not a martyr. Send your child with healthy lunch or snack and hope that all the communication and examples you’ve set forth take the lead. When they don’t, however, learn from the situation, try to do better next time and MOVE ON. You can not dwell on set backs. Stress can be just as bad as food choice on our health.

So, what do you think? Have feedback, ideas or a situation you’d like to ask, offer or share? Please do so in the comments section of this post or on the new Facebook page specifically for Pushups And Carrots. Share with your friends, continue the conversation, and create accountability for yourself.

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